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John RW Stott Memorial

Remembrance Book

It is amazing how God used one simple man to touch the lives of so many people throughout the world. This online remembrance book allows the friends of John Stott to express their joy and memories of his life. Please leave your thoughts, prayers, and photos on the legacy of John Stott with other visitors by filling out the form below. The leadership of Langham Partnership International and the family of John Stott will read all your messages; we regret, however, that we are unable to respond personally to each one.

If you have photos you would like to share, please email them to photos@langhampartnership.org to have them included in the online photo album.

1,156 entries...

  1. Kedrick Mapalo:

    Walvis Bay, Erongo, Namibia I am one of those people who considers themselves blessed.

    I first met Dr. RW Stott at Africa Evangelistic Enterprise in Pietermaritzburg South Africa in 1988. I joined a dinner table where he was seated and I introduced myself to him and then I asked him what his name was. Everybody kind of raised eyebrows because they thought it was obvious that I knew him. I told him that he looked different in person.

    He was a very bold man. On TV he’d challenged the South African government about apartheid without mincing words. I enjoyed his company when he was at AEE. I asked him personal question to which I got answers. (I reserve these for the book I will write in future).

    When I was working in ZAFES in Zambia, he’d written me a letter advising me about going into Eastern Europe to preach the gospel. I wished I hadn’t thrown the letter. I kept it for over 20 years but got rid of it when I moved to Walvis Bay, Namibia in 2008.

    In 1999, I again met him in Seoul, Korea at the IFES World Assembly. To my surprised he remembered that he’d met me at Africa Enterprise in South Africa about 10 years before. When Dr. Stott remembers you that way, you feel great!

    Dr. Stott contributed immensely to evangelical theological thought. He has influenced me in the cardinal things of the gospel. What impressed me most about him is the love he had in his heart for people. I heard him say people should be as passionate about feeding the poor as they are about gifts of the Holy Spirit. If people are offended by homosexuality, they should equally be offended by lies, graft and unfaithfulness.. What a balanced God-fearing man!

    By: Kedrick Mapalo (Former Senior Ministries Secretary -Zambia Fellowship of Evangelical Students-ZAFES now residing in Walvis Bay, Namibia as pastor of Potter’s Wheel Assembly of God Church).

  2. Joon-Ho Yang:

    Seoul/South Korea I’m really glad to join the site. I have known the site from his book named “The Radical Disciple”.
    This morning, I read the last chapter and then I decided that I am going to learn this book with my son and daughter. So I want to live I and my childern are as like Jesus Disciple.
    Thank you again and I pray for this mission.

  3. Nosayaba Evbuomwan:

    Southlake, Texas, USA Wow…As I write this, I have resting on my lap two of the classics by John Stott – Basic Christianity and Focus on Christ. I purchased these books in 1982 while I was doing my undergraduate studies in Civil Engineering at the University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. I never met John Stott, but his influence was greatly felt amongst many Evangelical Christian leaders of my generation in Nigeria. He was talked about so much, and perhaps his sermons rehearsed quite a lot then, that when I saw the two books in 1982, I wasted no time in buying and reading them. Now as a Pastor in Dallas, Texas the Holy Spirit has moved me in the last few days to re-examine our Focus on Christ. This led me to pick up John Stott’s book – Focus on Christ again. As wondered if he was still alive, I decided to check on the internet and discovered he had passed on to glory last year. Thank God for a such a simple and profoundly impacting life led by John Stott.

  4. David Isherwood:

    London I was visiting Dale aerodrome about three summers ago. My father was a pilot from New Zealand and landed and took off from the airport during the war. We walked down one of the runways when I turned to Anne and said, ‘I’m sure John Stott’s house is here somewhere.” We found it and walked up to it. We were greeted by John Stott who took us in and gave us tea and biscuits and showed great interested in where we had come from and why we were in Dale. His kindness and prayer were overwhelmingly generous. He loved us though we had never met personally before this moment. A encounter to treasure!

  5. Lee Triplett:

    Topeka/ Kansas/ U.S.A. I have been a christian for the past thirty years. Not until I began to read the writings of John Stott did I begin to understand what it means to be sensitive to scripture. And to allow that sensitivity to influence your life. Dr. Stott has left me with a new thirst for biblical scholarship and a new prespective on world evangelism.

  6. steve M.:

    One of the greatest theologions who lived in the 20th century–main speaker at Urbanas and author of a great number of theological books. Intervarsity speaker.

  7. Daniel Devadatta:

    Bangalore.Kar/India I met Dr. John Stott only once in my life. He was the guest speaker at Calvin College & Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan, in the mid to late 1990′s. I was a staff member. I met him after his presentation and introduced myself. He paused for just a fraction of moment and asked this question: “Who is Sam Devadatta?” I said that was my dad, who by the way died in 1973. Dr. Stott, with a smile, looked at me and said: “Your dad was responsible for my first trip to India, where I have gone each single year since then.”

    What struck me about this man, apart from his profound evangelical influence, was his memory. He remembered individual people in his life journey.

  8. Bishop David R.J.Evans:

    Warwick.England I first met John when he was visiting Cambridge for a CICCU sermon in the early 60s.Holy Trinity was overfull and as CICCU President I had to go to the vestry to ask him to speak to members without non-Christian friends to go to the overflow church.As I went into the vestry I seemed to be hit by a powerful spiritual presence,which knocked me backwards.Afterwards I remembered the description in the Jerusalem temple when the priests were unable to enter because of the overwhelming presence of the glory of God.
    Many years later when John was visitng us at a Christian university camp in Argentina we were travlling in a country bus up into the hills.Maybe 40 of us.John had no seat,but he led all of us in singing the round “No nobis Domine”.Not to us Lord but to you be the glory.It was a very moving experience for all the Argentine students involved.

    These two experiences illustrate for me John’s holiness and humanity.

  9. Andrew Collie:

    London, UK Humility is a word that keeps on reoccurring when hearing about the life of John Stott. A couple of days after joining the staff of All Souls Langham Place as its Buildings Manager I was called to John’s maisonette as his boiler had failed. I had heard him as a speaker at UCCF conferences but did not know him personally. Despite the regard in which he is held and the importance that was given by others to looking after his accommodation, I found a man entirely unaffected by the praises of many, who lived simply and was always grateful for my efforts whether they were initially successful or not. His life was one of integrity – the focus of his teaching and writing on what God has done for us rather than on himself was lived out in his relationships. To God be the glory.

  10. Gideon Ishmael Adjei:

    Kumasi / Ghana /W/Africa The body of Christ Jesus is grateful for the impact Rev.Dr John Scott had made in the Lord’s Vineyard Worldwide,more importantly in the majority world.

  11. DAUD SAGAR:

    orissa,india A rare blend of simplicity and profundity marked JOHN STOTT.

  12. Fasil Arega Woldemariam:

    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia I have read some of Dr. John Stott’s book; I was privileged to attend his lectures when he was here in Ethiopia; I heard also some wonderful testimonies about him from those who knew him personally. His departure to the Lord makes me feel sad and happy. I feel sad because, we have missed such a great man of God, who demonstrated devotion to the Lord Jesus through his over 7o years of discipleship, who modeled Christ-likeness in humility and integrity, who expressed his love to the lost by stressing, in his teachings and writings, on the priority of evangelism, who called and advocated for evangelical unity, truth, integrity, stability, contention for the gospel, and endurance, whose profound understanding of biblical truth was demonstrated and communicated through his clarity in his explanations, in a time when the church desperately needs more people like him. But I am also happy because he is now with his Lord enjoying the inexplicable joy of being in the presence of God, the joy reserved for those who love God and have finished their spiritual race like him. I believe that his legacy will continue influencing the generations to come.

  13. Dr Michael Schluter:

    Cambridge, England … And another vignette of John Scott

    I initially knew John as a friend who encouraged and supported my various work projects, but I got to know him somewhat better through a discussion group which met at his house twice a year. Occasionally I would visit him at other times too. My last visit was in early April 2007 at around 4 pm when I had been invited for a cup of tea.

    I rang the bell at the door of his flat several times, but no sign of John. I was just retreating from the doorstep to call him on my mobile phone when the door opened. He greeted me warmly in his usual way and then asked me rather quizzically, ‘What are you doing here at 4 o’clock in the morning?’ ‘It’s not 4 am,’ I told him, ‘It’s 4 pm’. There was a pause; ‘I’m afraid you’ll have to prove that to me,’ he responded. I took on the challenge and the conversation continued like this:

    MS: Can you see people at the end of the mews who are carrying briefcases? Do people normally walk around in London at 4 am carrying brief cases?

    John: No. Good point.

    MS: It is full daylight. Is it fully daylight at 4 am in April?

    John: No.

    MS: I have arrived at your door claiming that we are due to meet for a cup of tea. Would you expect me to get it wrong by a margin of 12 hours?

    John: No. I’m convinced. I do apologise for making you prove this to me, but I am concerned that I may have had a stroke. Making you prove this to me allows me to check that my reasoning ability is still intact!

    He then explained that he must just have overslept in his afternoon nap and awoken from a deep sleep in confusion. After that I was invited over the threshold to have the long awaited cup of tea.

    Even in the confusion of old age, there was still the courtesy, still the closely reasoning mind, and still the warmth of his friendship.

    Michael Schluter
    January 2012

  14. Ken & Beryl Lord:

    UK Beryl & I met John at the Arocha Centre in Portugal in 1990′s. For many years we had been aware of his ministry and had been greatly helped by his books and ministry. So we saw it was a great privilege to meet at last this ‘great Christian teacher’.
    We arrived at the Centre after our flight from England to be told that the team were going that afternoon up into the hills and would we like to go to see them ‘ring’ a three toed eagle chick. Also that John Stott who was at the centre for the weekend would be joining us.
    We had a great afternoon with John to the fore in our trek into the hills to the nest site and watching the team ringing this huge chick.
    Later that evening, after the meal, John asked Beryl and I if we would like to go down to the estuary to do a spot of bird watching.
    We had a great time with him for a couple of hours on our own and found that this ‘great Christian leader’ was so humble and encouraging enabling us to have fellowship with him in such a relaxed way.
    Just twenty four hours, as he was going onto Spain the next day, but leaving us with a lasting memory that we remember to this day.

  15. Donald M Macleod:

    Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia My wife and I first heard Rev John Stott in the Good Samaritan Church, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia in the mid 90′s. From then onwards, we tried to visit All Souls Church on the few occasions when we visited UK – I remember once we had difficulty in getting to the church due to a rail strike, so we ended up in the foyer towards the end of the service, listening to John finishing off another excellent message.

    We read many of his books after that and indeed, I have just finished his Biography and also “The Radical Disciple” and found them all inspiring and thought provoking. It was also very helpful to be able to download some of his sermons, such as his “Faith, Hope and Love Trilogy,” and to listen to them while travelling around the Far East on business, from my home in Sabah.

    I pray that his words and works will live on and continue to inspire and bless many – even as my wife and I have been blessed by his faithful ministry.

  16. Valerie Harper (Mrs):

    Bream, GLOS, UK He was a remarkable Man of God, full of grace and humilty. I was really blessed, inspired and encouraged through attending his confirmation classes 40 years ago at All Souls. As a result, I have continued to follow Christ throughout my life.

  17. Revd. J.L. Ladd Fagerson.:

    Fortingall. Perthshire Scotland.ed John Stott–a man of prayer, a man of vision, a man with amazing gifts of preaching and writing, a humble teacher for whom the world was truly his parish. “Of this blest man let this just praise be given, heaven was in him before he was in heaven.”
    I thank the Lord upon every remembrance of his faithful servant. He has had a profound influence upon my life since we first met at Midway Airport in Chicago in December 1956. John was taking a series of University Missions at American and Canadian colleges. He came to us at Harvard in February 1957.
    In April of that year, he wrote to invite me to come and spend the summer of ’57 at the Rectory in London before beginning my studies at London Bible College to “see what the Church of England was like from inside” Visiting the Hookses and being introduced to ‘orni-theology’, worshipping in the church in Dale and in St. David’s Cathedral made a lasting impression. He also arranged for me to go on a CSSM beach mission in Cornwall and to the work of Scripture Union that summer.
    Joining the All Souls staff as assistant warden of the All Souls Clubhouse in 1960 was valuable training before starting my ordination course at Ridley Hall, Cambridge. The Rector took time to send encouraging letters from 1961-1963 and provided wise counsel before I began my curacy at Tonbridge Parish Church with Canon T.F.C. Bewes. in 1963 John Stott sent a card to Rochester Cathedral as I was ordained to ministry in The Church of England and also in 1965 he sent a telegram to Thea and me on our wedding day.
    Uncle John was the one who at an Eclectics Conference in November 1966 pointed out an opening for ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan where we spent seven wonderfully fulfilling years from 1967-74. We had the joy of welcoming John to Kabul in 1972.
    Uncle John’s books from “Men with a Message” to “The Radical Christian” fill a long shelf of my library and have been a great blessing during my almost 50 years in active parish life and as Chaplain-schoolmaster at Rannoch School in Perthshire, Scotland. (1975-2000) Thea and I last met John when invited to dinner with him in Scotland in 2003.
    I will always treasure memories of his gracious humility, his incisive mind and his winsome Christ-likeness to which he challenged us all in his final address at Keswick. Now he has gone to be with his Saviour and Lord which is far better. Alleluia!

  18. Eric Alexander:

    Glasgow Scotland On behalf of an innumerable company of Scottish ministers who have found in John Stott a gracious mentor, a faithful model, and a treasured friend, we give heartfelt thanks to God.

  19. Dot Palmer Fry:

    London UK In 1967 I attended All Souls. After coming down from University where John had spoken in the CU a couple of times I wanted sound teaching. As a missionary’s child I have had a lifetime of Christian teaching. John stood out . His ability to express the profound in simple terms; his integrity, approachability and singleminded service has been my life’s inspiration. How blessed we are to have learned from him.
    Dot Palmer Fry – London and Dorset

  20. Deirdre Ducker:

    Hampshire England My husband, Richard and I met on the steps of All Souls a year later we were married there. I still remember John’s pre-marriage talk that was an example to aim at and helped us greatly over the next few years. After 6 years abroad we came back to the fold with 3 children & one on the way. 29 September 1968 Richard was killed in a plane crash. John’s empathy, loving care and ministry to me at that devastating time was truly from the Lord. He quietly arranged the funeral service, consulting me only for hymns and music and took the service so movingly. He Baptised the 2 younger children – 2 year old Rachelle putting him off by laughing at him. He continued to counsel and care for me, even remembering anniversaries when others forgot. Sitting in church worshipping and learning from his inspiring sermons was a privilege but his pastoral care was for me the most inspired part of his ministry.

  21. Philippa Chalkley ( Priston):

    Beckington Somerset UK When I lived for a short while in Italy in the early 80′s I met and came to respect two elderly women who were key to the work of GBU (IFES) in Italy. They new John well and mentioned that he liked olives. So on my return I took some to All Souls to give to him. I never knew whether he got them, but I was pleased to offer a small gift to a man who has blessed so many people throughout the world including me.

  22. Richard Gardner:

    Surrey, England I never knew John Stott very well, but he had a tremendous influence on me in leading me to Jesus. As a teenager, living near Gloucester, his book “ Your Confirmation “ ensured that I had a firm understanding of what it meant to follow Jesus and.as the Bishop put his hands on my head during the Confirmation Service I found myself accepting Jesus as my Lord and Saviour..

    My Christian faith grew at first, but overtime I had doubts and problems at home and in my mid- twenties in July 1971 I came to London to work determined to live life my way. A few months later, I found myself one Sunday evening in the gallery at All Souls listening to John Stott and hise invitation at the end of the sermon to go round to the Vestry door and speak to him further about following Jesus. I thought cynically to my self that he would pass me over to one of the Curates. Anyway I went round the side of All Souls to the Vestry door and to my absolute amazement he greeted me and arranged a meeting at the Rectory in Weymouth Street at about 5 pm before a Sunday evening service.

    These meetings then continued over a 6 month period and he did not appear to mind that I was initially very hostile towards the Christian Faith or that he had to fit me in between his many overseas visits. His main concern was that I was seeking Jesus. I will never forget that he said that the Christian Faith will stand up to scrutiny while at the same time pointing me to Jesus Once I committed myself again to Jesus and looking to him for my strength, John Stott then arranged for me to go to the “ Nursery Class”.

    I only spoke to John Stott twice after that , once to apologise for my initial hostility and secondly when he called across congratulations as Caroline , now my wife, and I came out of All Souls after our Banns were read. My thanks to him continue to this day for leading me to “Looking to Jesus” for my strength.

    I am certain that I did not receive preferential treatment from John Stott. He was always willing to help anyone who was seeking to find Jesus as their Lord and Saviour.

    Richard Gardner
    Banstead, Surrey

  23. Gordon Molyneux:

    Bristol (UK) During John Stott’s tour in 1980′s of strategic theological colleges in Africa, he came to the Bunia Theological Seminary (now Shalom University), in N-E Congo. He gave a series of lectures on Understanding and Interpreting the Bible. His ministry, I remember, made a big impact on the students, not only because of the clarity and depth of his talks but because of his prefacing remarks. Aware, no doubt, that the former Belgian Congo still carries collectively the scars of a cruel and exploitative colonial past, Stott’s first words as he stood to speak were to ask forgiveness, as a White European, for that long shameful chapter stretching from the 1880′s to 1960. No-one was expecting that this eminent scholar would say such things, and I recall that the hall became very quiet. When he eventually addressed his topic his words penetrated in a way that erudition alone could not have achieved.

  24. Vickraman Francis:

    Madras/tamilnadu/india I am a pastor serving the lord in a small urban area situated in the outskirt of Madras in South India.
    I was highly influenced by the writings of Rev. Stott. His books gave me wide range of new ideas and deep root in Bible. Understanding the Bible was my text book when I was training some young people who wanted to serve the Lord.
    I thank the Lord for giving such a knowledge to Rev.Stott and let the people like me to enjoy it.
    Praise be to the name of the Lord.

  25. JOHN GUNN:

    Nuneaton/Warwickshire,/UK I am very glad to remember John Stott in so many ways. His Christain Literature, his preaching and his Bible studies I have been very inspired with and they have been a blessing to other people’s lives as well. I feel very glad to have known John Stott and remember him as the most influentil clergyman in the Church of England and throughout the world.